Table of Contents

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, DC 20549
________________________________________
FORM 10-Q
________________________________________
(Mark One)
ý
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2019              or             
¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from              to             
Commission file number 1-12289
SEACOR Holdings Inc.
(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)
________________________________________
Delaware
 
13-3542736
(State or Other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)
 
(IRS Employer
Identification No.)
 
 
2200 Eller Drive, P.O. Box 13038,
 
 
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
 
33316
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)
 
(Zip Code)
954-523-2200
(Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code)
Not Applicable
(Former Name, Former Address and Former Fiscal Year, if Changed Since Last Report)
________________________________________
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes  ý    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes  ý     No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
Large accelerated filer  x
 
Accelerated filer  ¨
 
Non-accelerated filer  ¨
(Do not check if a smaller
reporting company)
 
Smaller reporting company  ¨
 
Emerging growth company  ¨
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes  ¨    No  ý
The total number of shares of common stock, par value $.01 per share, outstanding as of April 22, 2019 was 18,529,563. The Registrant has no other class of common stock outstanding.


Table of Contents

SEACOR HOLDINGS INC.
Table of Contents

Part I.
 
 
 
 
Item 1.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Item 2.
 
 
 
 
Item 3.
 
 
 
 
Item 4.
 
 
 
Part II.
 
 
 
 
Item 1.
 
 
 
 
 
Item 1A.
 
 
 
 
 
Item 2.
 
 
 
 
 
Item 3.
 
 
 
 
 
Item 4.
 
 
 
 
 
Item 5.
 
 
 
 
 
Item 6.


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PART I—FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ITEM 1.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
SEACOR HOLDINGS INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(in thousands, except share data, unaudited)
 
March 31,
2019
 
December 31,
2018
ASSETS
 
 
 
Current Assets:
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
141,152

 
$
144,221

Restricted cash and restricted cash equivalents
2,992

 
2,991

Marketable securities
33,384

 
30,316

Receivables:
 
 
 
Trade, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $3,618 and $3,481 in 2019 and 2018, respectively
174,278

 
171,828

Other
32,635

 
38,881

Inventories
4,914

 
4,530

Prepaid expenses and other
5,809

 
5,382

Total current assets
395,164

 
398,149

Property and Equipment:
 
 
 
Historical cost
1,413,488

 
1,407,329

Accumulated depreciation
(577,136
)
 
(560,819
)
Net property and equipment
836,352

 
846,510

Operating Lease Right-of-Use Assets
167,325

 

Investments, at Equity, and Advances to 50% or Less Owned Companies
155,290

 
156,886

Construction Reserve Funds
3,908

 
3,908

Goodwill
32,720

 
32,708

Intangible Assets, Net
23,662

 
24,551

Other Assets
7,385

 
8,312

 
$
1,621,806

 
$
1,471,024

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
 
 
 
Current Liabilities:
 
 
 
Current portion of long-term debt
$
8,308

 
$
8,497

Current portion of long-term operating lease liabilities
35,540

 

Accounts payable and accrued expenses
50,097

 
59,607

Other current liabilities
67,456

 
55,659

Total current liabilities
161,401

 
123,763

Long-Term Debt
315,303

 
346,128

Long-Term Operating Lease Liabilities
131,862

 

Deferred Income Taxes
97,758

 
94,420

Deferred Gains and Other Liabilities
20,688

 
52,871

Total liabilities
727,012

 
617,182

Equity:
 
 
 
SEACOR Holdings Inc. stockholders’ equity:
 
 
 
Preferred stock, $.01 par value, 10,000,000 shares authorized; none issued nor outstanding

 

Common stock, $.01 par value, 60,000,000 shares authorized; 39,185,231 and 39,001,924 shares issued in 2019 and 2018, respectively
392

 
390

Additional paid-in capital
1,598,804

 
1,596,642

Retained earnings
498,065

 
474,809

Shares held in treasury of 20,657,171 and 20,671,627 in 2019 and 2018, respectively, at cost
(1,366,267
)
 
(1,366,773
)
Accumulated other comprehensive loss, net of tax
(903
)
 
(914
)
 
730,091

 
704,154

Noncontrolling interests in subsidiaries
164,703

 
149,688

Total equity
894,794

 
853,842

 
$
1,621,806

 
$
1,471,024





The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements
and should be read in conjunction herewith.

1

Table of Contents

SEACOR HOLDINGS INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME
(in thousands, except share data, unaudited)
 
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
2019
 
2018
Operating Revenues
$
209,524

 
$
184,824

Costs and Expenses:
 
 
 
Operating
147,111

 
131,777

Administrative and general
26,746

 
25,795

Depreciation and amortization
17,136

 
19,609

 
190,993

 
177,181

Gains on Asset Dispositions
437

 
7,045

Operating Income
18,968

 
14,688

Other Income (Expense):
 
 
 
Interest income
1,900

 
1,856

Interest expense
(5,113
)
 
(8,563
)
Debt extinguishment losses
(793
)
 
(42
)
Marketable security gains (losses), net
3,068

 
(3,798
)
Foreign currency gains, net
405

 
1,690

Other, net
(644
)
 
283

 
(1,177
)
 
(8,574
)
Income Before Income Tax Expense (Benefit) and Equity in Losses of 50% or Less Owned Companies
17,791

 
6,114

Income Tax Expense (Benefit)
2,205

 
(281
)
Income Before Equity in Losses of 50% or Less Owned Companies
15,586

 
6,395

Equity in Losses of 50% or Less Owned Companies, Net of Tax
(2,518
)
 
(837
)
Net Income
13,068

 
5,558

Net Income attributable to Noncontrolling Interests in Subsidiaries
5,335

 
4,917

Net Income attributable to SEACOR Holdings Inc.
$
7,733

 
$
641

 
 
 
Basic Earnings Per Common Share of SEACOR Holdings Inc.
$
0.42

 
$
0.04

 
 
 
Diluted Earnings Per Common Share of SEACOR Holdings Inc.
$
0.41

 
$
0.04

 
 
 
 
Weighted Average Common Shares Outstanding:
 
 
 
Basic
18,232,562

 
17,969,970

Diluted
19,571,339

 
18,178,518















The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements
and should be read in conjunction herewith.

2

Table of Contents

SEACOR HOLDINGS INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
(in thousands, unaudited)
 
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
2019
 
2018
Net Income
$
13,068

 
$
5,558

Other Comprehensive Income:
 
 
 
Foreign currency translation gains
79

 
644

Income tax expense
(68
)
 
(3
)
 
11

 
641

Comprehensive Income
13,079

 
6,199

Comprehensive Income attributable to Noncontrolling Interests in Subsidiaries
5,335

 
4,917

Comprehensive Income attributable to SEACOR Holdings Inc.
$
7,744

 
$
1,282










































The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements
and should be read in conjunction herewith.

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SEACOR HOLDINGS INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN EQUITY
(in thousands, unaudited)
 
SEACOR Holdings Inc. Stockholders’ Equity
 
Non-
Controlling
Interests In
Subsidiaries
 
Total
Equity
 
Common
Stock
 
Additional
Paid-In
Capital
 
Retained
Earnings
 
Treasury Stock
 
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Loss
 
December 31, 2018
$
390

 
$
1,596,642

 
$
474,809

 
$
(1,366,773
)
 
$
(914
)
 
$
149,688

 
$
853,842

Impact of adoption of accounting principle, net of tax

 

 
15,523

 

 

 
9,836

 
25,359

December 31, 2018, As Adjusted
390

 
1,596,642

 
490,332

 
(1,366,773
)
 
(914
)
 
159,524

 
879,201

Issuance of common stock:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Employee Stock Purchase Plan

 

 

 
857

 

 

 
857

Exercise of stock options

 
873

 

 

 

 

 
873

Director stock awards

 
33

 

 

 

 

 
33

Restricted stock
2

 
(2
)
 

 

 

 

 

Purchase of treasury shares

 

 

 
(351
)
 

 

 
(351
)
Amortization of share awards

 
1,258

 

 

 

 

 
1,258

Distributions to noncontrolling interests

 

 

 

 

 
(156
)
 
(156
)
Net income

 

 
7,733

 

 

 
5,335

 
13,068

Other comprehensive income

 

 

 

 
11

 

 
11

March 31, 2019
$
392

 
$
1,598,804

 
$
498,065

 
$
(1,366,267
)
 
$
(903
)
 
$
164,703

 
$
894,794



 
SEACOR Holdings Inc. Stockholders’ Equity
 
Non-
Controlling
Interests In
Subsidiaries
 
Total
Equity
 
Common
Stock
 
Additional
Paid-In
Capital
 
Retained
Earnings
 
Treasury Stock
 
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
 
December 31, 2017
$
387

 
$
1,573,013

 
$
419,128

 
$
(1,368,300
)
 
$
(545
)
 
$
129,678

 
$
753,361

Impact of adoption of accounting principle

 

 
(2,467
)
 

 

 

 
(2,467
)
December 31, 2017, As Adjusted
387

 
1,573,013

 
416,661

 
(1,368,300
)
 
(545
)
 
129,678

 
750,894

Issuance of common stock:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Employee Stock Purchase Plan

 

 

 
867

 

 

 
867

Exercise of stock options
1

 
2,727

 

 

 

 

 
2,728

Director stock awards

 
20

 

 

 

 

 
20

Restricted stock
1

 
(1
)
 

 

 

 

 

Amortization of share awards

 
898

 

 

 

 

 
898

Distributions to noncontrolling interests

 

 

 

 

 
(132
)
 
(132
)
Net income

 

 
641

 

 

 
4,917

 
5,558

Other comprehensive income

 

 

 

 
641

 

 
641

March 31, 2018
$
389

 
$
1,576,657

 
$
417,302

 
$
(1,367,433
)
 
$
96

 
$
134,463

 
$
761,474









The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements
and should be read in conjunction herewith.

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SEACOR HOLDINGS INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(in thousands, unaudited)
 
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
2019
 
2018
Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities
$
34,660

 
$
12,907

Cash Flows from Investing Activities:
 
 
 
Purchases of property and equipment
(5,649
)
 
(9,542
)
Proceeds from disposition of property and equipment
120

 
15,852

Investments in and advances to 50% or less owned companies

 
(900
)
Return of investments and advances from 50% or less owned companies

 
4,772

Payments received on third-party leases and notes receivable, net
165

 
150

Withdrawals from construction reserve funds

 
14,549

Business acquisitions, net of cash acquired

 
79

Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities
(5,364
)
 
24,960

Cash Flows from Financing Activities:
 
 
 
Payments on long-term debt
(31,396
)
 
(8,071
)
Payments for long-term debt issue costs
(2,197
)
 

Common stock acquired for treasury
(351
)
 

Proceeds from share award plans
1,730

 
3,595

Distributions to noncontrolling interests
(156
)
 
(132
)
Net cash used in financing activities
(32,370
)
 
(4,608
)
Effects of Exchange Rate Changes on Cash, Cash Equivalents, Restricted Cash and Restricted Cash Equivalents
6

 
17

Net Increase (Decrease) in Cash, Cash Equivalents, Restricted Cash and Restricted Cash Equivalents
(3,068
)
 
33,276

Cash, Cash Equivalents, Restricted Cash and Restricted Cash Equivalents, Beginning of Period
147,212

 
242,228

Cash, Cash Equivalents, Restricted Cash and Restricted Cash Equivalents, End of Period
144,144

 
275,504

Restricted Cash and Restricted Cash Equivalents, End of Period
2,992

 
2,982

Cash and Cash Equivalents, End of Period
$
141,152

 
$
272,522























The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements
and should be read in conjunction herewith.

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SEACOR HOLDINGS INC.
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(unaudited)
1. BASIS OF PRESENTATION AND ACCOUNTING POLICIES
Unless the context otherwise indicates, any reference in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q to the “Company” refers to SEACOR Holdings Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries and any reference in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q to “SEACOR” refers to SEACOR Holdings Inc. without its consolidated subsidiaries. Capitalized terms used and not specifically defined herein have the same meaning given those terms in the Company's Annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018.
The condensed consolidated financial information for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018 has been prepared by the Company and has not been audited by its independent registered certified public accounting firm. The condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of SEACOR Holdings Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries. In the opinion of management, all adjustments (consisting of normal recurring adjustments) have been made to fairly present the Company’s financial position as of March 31, 2019, its results of operations for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, its comprehensive income for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, its changes in equity for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, and its cash flows for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018. Results of operations for the interim periods presented are not necessarily indicative of operating results for the full year or any future periods.
Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States have been condensed or omitted. These condensed consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and related notes thereto included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018.
Adoption of New Accounting Standards. On January 1, 2019, the Company adopted Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Topic 842, Leases (“Topic 842”) using a modified prospective approach and implemented internal controls and systems to enable the preparation of financial information upon adoption. The Company elected the available practical expedients permitted under the guidance including the option to not separate lease and nonlease components in calculating the right-of use assets and corresponding lease liabilities and to not apply the recognition requirements of Topic 842 to short-term leases (leases that have a duration of twelve months or less at lease inception). Generally, it was not possible for the Company to determine the interest rate implicit in each of its operating leases and therefore used its incremental borrowing rate in calculating operating lease right-of-use assets and lease liabilities. The Company assigned its leases to portfolios based on the remaining term at the time of adoption and applied a single rate to each portfolio of leases as the result was not materially different than using a specific discount rate for each individual lease. The Company included renewal options that were reasonably certain of being exercised in determining the lease term. Upon adoption, the Company recorded operating lease right-of-use assets and lease liabilities of $174.6 million for certain of its equipment, office and land leases (see Note 5). In addition, the Company recognized a cumulative-effect adjustment of $25.4 million, net of tax, to the opening balance of retained earnings primarily for previously deferred gains related to sale leaseback transactions.
On January 1, 2018, the Company adopted ASU 2016-16, Intra-Entity Transfers of Assets Other Than Inventory, which eliminates the deferral of the tax effects of intercompany asset sales other than inventory until the transferred assets are sold to a third party or recovered through use. As a result of the adoption of the standard, the deferred tax charges previously recognized from those sales resulted in a decrease in deferred tax assets and a cumulative adjustment to retained earnings of $2.5 million in the consolidated balance sheets and statements of changes in equity as of January 1, 2018.
Revenue Recognition. Revenue is recognized when (or as) the Company transfers promised goods or services to its customers in amounts that reflect the consideration to which the Company expects to be entitled to in exchange for those goods or services, which occurs when (or as) the Company satisfies its contractual obligations and transfers control of the promised goods or services to its customers. Costs to obtain or fulfill a contract are expensed as incurred.
Revenue from Contracts with Customers. Ocean Services primarily earns revenues from voyage charters, contracts of affreightment, tariff based port and infrastructure services, unit freight logistics services, and technical ship management agreements with vessel owners (see Note 12). Ocean Services transfers control of the service to the customer and satisfies its performance obligation over the term of the contract, and therefore recognizes revenue over the term of the contract while related costs are expensed as incurred. Voyage charters are contracts to carry cargoes on a single voyage basis for a predetermined price, regardless of time to complete. Contracts of affreightment are contracts for cargoes that are committed on a multi-voyage basis for various periods of time, with minimum and maximum cargo tonnages specified over the period at a fixed or escalating rate per ton. Tariff based port and infrastructure services typically include operating harbor tugs alongside oceangoing vessels to escort them to their berth, assisting with the docking and undocking of these oceangoing vessels and escorting them back out to sea. They are contracted using prevailing port tariff terms on a per-use basis. In the unit freight logistics trade, transportation services typically include transporting shipping containers, rail cars, project cargoes, automobiles and U.S. military vehicles and are generally contracted

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on a per unit basis for the specified cargo and destination, typically in accordance with a publicly available tariff rate or based on a negotiated rate when moving larger volumes over an extended period. Managed services include technical ship management agreements whereby Ocean Services provides technical ship management services to third-party customers for a predetermined price over a specified period of time, typically a year or more.
Inland Services primarily earns revenues from contracts of affreightment, terminal operations, fleeting operations and repair and maintenance services (see Note 12). Inland Services transfers control of the service to the customer and satisfies its performance obligation over the term of the contract, and therefore recognizes revenue over the term of the contract while related costs are expensed as incurred. Contracts of affreightment are contracts whereby customers are charged an established rate per ton to transport cargo from point-to-point. Terminal operations includes tank farms and dry bulk and container handling facilities that are marketed under contractual rates and terms driven by throughput volume. Fleeting operations includes fleeting services whereby barges are held in fleeting areas for an agreed-upon day rate and shifting services whereby harbor boats are used to pick up and drop off barges to assist in assembling tows and to move barges to and from the dock for loading and unloading at predetermined per-shift fees. Other operations primarily include a machine shop specializing in towboat and barge cleaning, repair and maintenance services that are charged on an hourly or a fixed fee basis depending on the scope and nature of the work.
Witt O’Brien’s primarily earns revenues from time and material and retainer contracts (see Note 12). Witt O’Brien’s transfers control of the service to the customer and satisfies its performance obligation over the term of the contract, and therefore recognizes revenue over the term of the contract while related costs are expensed as incurred. Time and material contracts primarily relate to emergency response, debris management or consulting services that Witt O’Brien’s performs for a predetermined fee. Retainer contracts, which are nearly all with vessel services operators and oil companies, are contracted based on agreed-upon rates.
The Company’s Other business segment includes CLEANCOR Energy Solutions LLC and its subsidiaries (collectively “Cleancor”), which primarily earns revenues from the sale of liquefied natural gas (see Note 12). Under these arrangements, control of the goods are transferred to the customer and performance obligations are satisfied at a point in time, and therefore revenue is recognized upon delivery while any related costs are expensed as incurred.
Contract liabilities from contracts with customers arise when the Company has received consideration prior to performance and are included in other current liabilities in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets. The Company’s contract liability activity for the three months ended March 31 was as follows (in thousands):
 
2019
Balance at beginning of period
$
968

Contract liabilities arising during the period
7,351

Revenue recognized upon completion of performance obligations during the period
(408
)
Balance at end of period
$
7,911

Lease Revenues. The Company’s lease revenues are primarily from time charters, bareboat charters and non-vessel rental arrangements. The Company accounts for these leases as operating leases. The lease terms are included in the charter and rental arrangements, and the determination of whether those arrangements contain a lease generally does not require significant assumptions or judgments. The Company’s lease revenues do not include material amounts of variable payments and are recognized ratably over the lease term as services are provided, typically on a per day basis.
Under a time charter, the Company provides a vessel to a customer for a set term and is responsible for all operating expenses, typically excluding fuel. The non-lease components included in time charter rates are typically crewing, maintenance and insurance for the vessel over the term of the lease. Under a bareboat charter, the Company provides a vessel to a customer for a set term and the customer assumes responsibility for all operating expenses and risks of operation. Under non-vessel rental arrangements, the Company provides non-vessel property or equipment to a customer for a set term and the customer assumes responsibility for all operating expenses and risks of operation. There are no non-lease components for bareboat charters and non-vessel rental arrangements.
Lease revenues are generated from owned equipment as well as equipment that is leased-in from other equipment owners or financial institutions. Lease revenues from equipment that is leased-in are included in sublease income for the Company’s lessee disclosures (see Note 5). The Company’s leases generally do not provide an option for customers to purchase the leased equipment and lessees do not provide residual value guarantees. The Company expects to derive significant benefits from its equipment following the end of the lease terms.
Property and Equipment. Equipment, stated at cost, is depreciated using the straight-line method over the estimated useful life of the asset to an estimated salvage value. With respect to each class of asset, the estimated useful life is based upon a newly built asset being placed into service and represents the time period beyond which it is typically not justifiable for the Company to continue to operate the asset in the same or similar manner. From time to time, the Company may acquire older assets

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that have already exceeded their useful life as set forth in the Company’s useful life policy, in which case the Company depreciates such assets based on its best estimate of remaining useful life, typically the next survey or certification date.
As of March 31, 2019, the estimated useful life (in years) of each of the Company’s major categories of new equipment was as follows:
Petroleum and chemical carriers - U.S.-flag
25
Bulk carriers - U.S.-flag
25
Harbor and offshore tugs
25
Ocean liquid tank barges
25
Short-sea container/RORO(1) vessels
20
Inland river dry-cargo and specialty barges
20
Inland river liquid tank barges
25
Inland river towboats and harbor boats
25
Terminal and fleeting facilities
20
______________________
(1)
Roll On/Roll Off.
Equipment maintenance and repair costs including the costs of routine overhauls, dry-dockings and inspections performed on vessels and equipment are charged to operating expense as incurred. Expenditures that extend the useful life or improve the marketing and commercial characteristics of equipment as well as major renewals and improvements to other properties are capitalized.
As of March 31, 2019, the Company’s construction in progress totaling $9.6 million primarily consisted of the construction of and upgrades to inland river towboats and the construction of other Inland Services equipment, and is included in historical cost in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets. Certain interest costs incurred during the construction of equipment are capitalized as part of the assets’ carrying values and are amortized over such assets’ estimated useful lives. During the three months ended March 31, 2019, the amount of capitalized interest was not material.
Impairment of Long-Lived Assets. The Company performs an impairment analysis of long-lived assets used in operations, including intangible assets, when indicators of impairment are present. These indicators may include a significant decrease in the market price of a long-lived asset or asset group, a significant adverse change in the extent or manner in which a long-lived asset or asset group is being used or in its physical condition, or a current period operating or cash flow loss combined with a history of operating or cash flow losses or a forecast that demonstrates continuing losses associated with the use of a long-lived asset or asset group. If the carrying values of the assets are not recoverable, as determined by the estimated undiscounted cash flows, the estimated fair value of the assets or asset groups are compared to their current carrying value and impairment charges are recorded if the carrying value exceeds fair value. The Company performs its testing on an asset or asset group basis. The Company’s estimates of undiscounted cash flows are highly subjective and actual results may vary from the Company’s estimates due to the uncertainty regarding projected financial performance. Generally, fair value is determined using valuation techniques, such as expected discounted cash flows or appraisals, as appropriate. During the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company did not recognize any impairment charges related to long-lived assets held for use.
Impairment of 50% or Less Owned Companies. Investments in 50% or less owned companies are reviewed periodically to assess whether there is an other-than-temporary decline in the carrying value of the investment. In its evaluation, the Company considers, among other items, recent and expected financial performance and returns, impairments recorded by the investee and the capital structure of the investee. When the Company determines the estimated fair value of an investment is below carrying value and the decline is other-than-temporary, the investment is written down to its estimated fair value. Actual results may vary from the Company’s estimates due to the uncertainty regarding projected financial performance, the severity and expected duration of declines in value and the available liquidity in the capital markets to support the continuing operations of the investee, among other factors. Although the Company believes its assumptions and estimates are reasonable, the investee’s actual performance compared with the estimates could produce different results and lead to additional impairment charges in future periods. During the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company did not recognize any impairment charges related to its 50% or less owned companies.
Income Taxes. During the three months ended March 31, 2019, the Company’s effective income tax rate of 12.4% was primarily due to foreign sourced income not subject to U.S. tax, taxes not provided on income attributable to noncontrolling interests and income subject to tonnage tax, partially offset by foreign taxes not creditable against U.S. income tax (see Note 6).

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Deferred Gains. The Company has sold certain equipment to its 50% or less owned companies, entered into vessel sale-leaseback transactions with finance companies, and provided seller financing on sales of its equipment to third parties and its 50% or less owned companies. A portion of the gains realized from these transactions were deferred and recorded in deferred gains and other liabilities in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets. Deferred gain activity related to these transactions for the three months ended March 31 was as follows (in thousands):
 
2019
 
2018
Balance at beginning of period
$
43,664

 
$
72,453

Impact of adoption of accounting principle(1)
(29,207
)
 

Amortization of deferred gains included in operating expenses as a reduction to rental expense

 
(2,557
)
Amortization of deferred gains included in gains on asset dispositions
(331
)
 
(518
)
Balance at end of period
$
14,126

 
$
69,378

______________________
(1)
On January 1, 2019, the Company adopted Topic 842 and reduced deferred gains associated with sale-leaseback transactions through a beginning period retained earnings adjustment.
 
Earnings Per Share. Basic earnings per common share of SEACOR is computed based on the weighted average number of common shares issued and outstanding during the relevant periods. Diluted earnings per common share of SEACOR is computed based on the weighted average number of common shares issued and outstanding plus the effect of potentially dilutive securities through the application of the treasury stock and if-converted methods. Dilutive securities for this purpose assumes restricted stock grants have vested, common shares have been issued pursuant to the exercise of outstanding stock options and common shares have been issued pursuant to the conversion of all outstanding convertible notes.
Computations of basic and diluted earnings per common share of SEACOR were as follows (in thousands, except share data):
 
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
Net Income attributable to SEACOR
 
Average O/S Shares
 
Per Share
2019
 
 
 
 
 
Basic Weighted Average Common Shares Outstanding
$
7,733

 
18,232,562

 
$
0.42

Effect of Dilutive Securities:
 
 
 
 
 
Options and Restricted Stock(1)

 
111,676

 
 
Convertible Notes(2)
318

 
1,227,101

 
 
Diluted Weighted Average Common Shares Outstanding
$
8,051

 
19,571,339

 
$
0.41

2018
 
 
 
 
 
Basic Weighted Average Common Shares Outstanding
$
641

 
17,969,970

 
$
0.04

Effect of Dilutive Securities:
 
 
 
 
 
Options and Restricted Stock(3)

 
208,548

 
 
Convertible Notes(4)

 

 
 
Diluted Weighted Average Common Shares Outstanding
$
641

 
18,178,518

 
$
0.04

______________________
(1)
For the three months ended March 31, 2019, diluted earnings per common share of SEACOR excluded 1,012,711 of certain share awards as the effect of their inclusion in the computation would be anti-dilutive.
(2)
For the three months ended March 31, 2019, diluted earnings per common share of SEACOR excluded 1,302,221 of common shares issuable pursuant to the Company’s 3.0% Convertible Senior Notes and 1,553,780 of common shares pursuant to the Company’s 3.25% Convertible Senior Notes as the effect of their inclusion in the computation would be anti-dilutive.
(3)
For the three months ended March 31, 2018, diluted earnings per common share of SEACOR excluded 503,459 of certain share awards as the effect of their inclusion in the computation would be anti-dilutive.
(4)
For the three months ended March 31, 2018, diluted earnings per common share of SEACOR excluded 1,227,101 of common shares issuable pursuant to the Company’s 2.5% Convertible Senior Notes and 2,895,516 of common shares issuable pursuant to the Company’s 3.0% Convertible Senior Notes as the effect of their inclusion in the computation would be anti-dilutive.
New Accounting Pronouncements. On June 16, 2016, the FASB issued an amendment to the accounting standards, which replaces the current incurred loss impairment methodology for financial assets measured at amortized cost with a methodology that reflects expected credit losses and requires consideration of a broader range of reasonable and supportable

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information, including forecasted information, to develop credit loss estimates. The new standard is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018. The Company has not yet determined what impact, if any, the adoption of the new standard will have on its consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows.
On January 26, 2017, the FASB issued an amendment to the accounting standards, which simplified wording and removed step two of the goodwill impairment test. A goodwill impairment will now be the amount by which a reporting unit’s carrying value exceeds its fair value, not to exceed the carrying amount of goodwill. The FASB also eliminated the requirements for any reporting unit with a zero or negative carrying amount to perform a qualitative assessment and, if it fails that qualitative test, to perform step two of the goodwill test. The new standard is effective for annual or interim goodwill impairment tests in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020, with early adoption permitted for interim or annual goodwill impairment tests on testing dates after January 1, 2017. The Company has not yet determined what impact, if any, the adoption of the new standard will have on its consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows.
2. EQUIPMENT ACQUISITIONS AND DISPOSITIONS
During the three months ended March 31, 2019, capital expenditures were $5.6 million and primarily related to the acquisition of real property, upgrades to inland river towboats and the construction of other Inland Services equipment.
During the three months ended March 31, 2019, the Company recognized previously deferred gains of $0.3 million.
3. INVESTMENTS, AT EQUITY, AND ADVANCES TO 50% OR LESS OWNED COMPANIES
KSM. KSM operates four foreign-flag harbor tugs, one foreign-flag ocean liquid tank barge and one foreign-flag specialty vessel in Freeport, Grand Bahama. During the three months ended March 31, 2019, the Company earned $0.3 million for the bareboat charter of two foreign-flag harbor tugs to KSM.
Trailer Bridge. Trailer Bridge is an operator of U.S.-flag deck and RORO barges and provides marine transportation services between Jacksonville, Florida, San Juan, Puerto Rico and Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic. During the three months ended March 31, 2019, the Company earned $0.9 million for the time charter of one U.S.-flag offshore tug to Trailer Bridge.
SCF Bunge Marine. SCF Bunge Marine provides towing services on the U.S. Inland Waterways, primarily the Mississippi River, Illinois River, Tennessee River and Ohio River. During the three months ended March 31, 2019, the Company earned $1.6 million for the time charter of seven inland river towboats to SCF Bunge Marine.
Bunge-SCF Grain. Bunge-SCF Grain operates terminal grain elevators in Illinois. During the three months ended March 31, 2019, the Company earned $0.2 million for the lease of a terminal facility to Bunge-SCF Grain.
4. LONG-TERM DEBT
SEACOR’s Board of Directors previously approved a securities repurchase plan that authorizes the Company to acquire SEACOR common stock, par value $0.01 per share (“Common Stock”), 3.25% Convertible Senior Notes, 3.0% Convertible Senior Notes and 2.5% Convertible Senior Notes (collectively the “Securities”) through open market purchases, privately negotiated transactions or otherwise, depending on market conditions. As of March 31, 2019, the Company’s remaining repurchase authority for the Securities was $43.5 million.
3.0% Convertible Senior Notes. During the three months ended March 31, 2019, the Company purchased $24.0 million in principal amount of its 3.0% Convertible Senior Notes for $23.2 million, resulting in debt extinguishment losses of $0.8 million included in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of income. The outstanding principal amount of these notes was $83.3 million as of March 31, 2019.
SEACOR Revolving Credit Facility. On March 19, 2019, the Company entered into a $125.0 million credit agreement with a syndicate of lenders that matures March 19, 2024 (the “SEACOR Revolving Credit Facility”) and is secured by a pledge over all of the Company’s and certain of its subsidiaries assets, subject to certain exceptions. The SEACOR Revolving Credit Facility includes revolving loans up to $125.0 million, as such amount may increase or decrease in accordance with the terms of the Credit Agreement. The loans will bear interest at either (i) a Base Rate plus a margin ranging from 0.75% to 2.00% depending on the Company’s maximum net funded debt ratio, as determined in accordance with the SEACOR Revolving Credit Facility, or (ii) interest periods of one, two, three or six months at an annual rate equal to London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) for the corresponding deposits of U.S. dollars, plus a margin ranging from 1.75% to 3.00% based on the Company’s maximum net funded debt ratio, as determined in accordance with the SEACOR Revolving Credit Facility. A fee of 0.5% is payable on the unused commitment quarterly. The Company incurred $2.2 million of issuance costs related to the SEACOR Revolving Credit Facility.

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The SEACOR Revolving Credit Facility contains various financial and restrictive covenants including fixed charge coverage, a net funded debt ratio, a collateral coverage ratio and restrictions limiting the Company’s ability to pay dividends or make certain investments, as well as other customary covenants, representations and warranties, and events of default as defined in the agreement. As of March 31, 2019, the Company had no outstanding borrowings or issued letters of credit under the SEACOR Revolving Credit Facility and the remaining availability under this facility was $125.0 million.
SEA-Vista Credit Facility. During the three months ended March 31, 2019, SEA-Vista repaid $6.0 million on the Revolving Loan and made scheduled payments of $0.8 million on the Term A-1 Loan and $1.3 million on the Term A-2 Loan. As of March 31, 2019, SEA-Vista had $100.0 million of remaining borrowing capacity under the Revolving Loan.
Other. During the three months ended March 31, 2019, the Company made scheduled payments on other long-term debt of $0.2 million.
Letters of Credit. As of March 31, 2019, the Company had outstanding letters of credit totaling $3.0 million with various expiration dates through 2027.
Guarantees. The Company has guaranteed the payments of amounts owed under certain sale-leaseback transactions, equipment financing and multi-employer pension obligations on behalf of SEACOR Marine. As of March 31, 2019, these guarantees on behalf of SEACOR Marine totaled $36.6 million and decline as payments are made on the outstanding obligations. The Company earns a fee of 0.5% per annum on these guarantees. For the three months ended March 31, 2019, the fees earned by the Company for these guarantees were not material.
5. OPERATING LEASES
Lessee. As of March 31, 2019, the Company leases in two U.S.-flag petroleum and chemical carriers, five U.S.-flag harbor tugs, four U.S.-flag PCTCs, 50 inland river dry-cargo barges, four inland river towboats, six inland river harbor boats and certain facilities and other equipment. The leases generally contain purchase and renewal options or rights of first refusal with respect to the sale or lease of the equipment. As of March 31, 2019, the remaining lease terms of the U.S.-flag petroleum and chemical carriers, which are subject to subleases, have remaining durations from 42 to 89 months. The lease terms of the other equipment range in duration from 12 to 204 months.
As of March 31, 2019, future minimum payments for operating leases for the remainder of 2019 and the years ended December 31 were as follows (in thousands):
Remainder of 2019
$
32,030

2020
40,792

2021
36,623

2022
26,780

2023
14,835

Years subsequent to 2023
40,382

 
191,442

Interest component
(24,040
)
 
167,402

Current portion of long-term operating lease liabilities
(35,540
)
Long-term operating lease liabilities
$
131,862

For the three months ended March 31, 2019, the components of lease expense were as follows (in thousands):
 
2019
Operating lease expense
$
10,554

Short-term lease expense (lease duration of twelve months or less at lease commencement)
6,720

Sublease income
(8,225
)
 
$
9,049


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For the three months ended March 31, other information related to operating leases was as follows (in thousands except weighted average data):
 
2019
Operating cash outflows from operating leases
$
10,482

Right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for operating lease liabilities
$
175,897

Weighted average remaining lease term, in years
5.7

Weighted average discount rate
4.8
%
Lessor. As of March 31, 2019, lessor arrangements with remaining terms in excess of one year included the bareboat charter of three U.S.-flag petroleum and chemical carriers and two U.S.-flag harbor tugs, the time charter of four U.S.-flag petroleum and chemical carriers, four U.S.-flag PCTCs, seven inland river towboats and one U.S.-flag offshore tug, and other non-vessel rental arrangements of certain property and equipment. As of March 31, 2019, future minimum lease revenues from these arrangements for the remainder of 2019 and in the years ended December 31 were as follows (in thousands):
 
Total Minimum Lease Revenues
 
Leased-in Obligations(1)
 
Net Minimum Lease Income
Remainder of 2019
$
110,773

 
$
(23,944
)
 
$
86,829

2020
137,257

 
(31,595
)
 
105,662

2021
104,792

 
(29,590
)
 
75,202

2022
54,374

 
(22,812
)
 
31,562

2023
34,674

 
(11,315
)
 
23,359

Years subsequent to 2023
87,375

 
(29,884
)
 
57,491

____________________
(1)
The total payments to be made under existing non-cancelable leases for the property and equipment subject to these future minimum lease revenues.
As of March 31, 2019, the major classes of owned property and equipment earning lease revenues were as follows (in thousands):
 
Historical
Cost
 
Accumulated
Depreciation
 
Net Book
Value
2019
 
 
 
 
 
Ocean Services:
 
 
 
 
 
Petroleum and chemical carriers - U.S.-flag
$
472,462

 
$
(187,296
)
 
285,166

Harbor and offshore tugs - U.S.-flag
21,440

 
(2,173
)
 
19,267

 
493,902

 
(189,469
)
 
304,433

Inland Services:
 
 
 
 


Towboats
36,236

 
(2,435
)
 
33,801

 
530,138

 
(191,904
)
 
338,234

6. INCOME TAXES
The following table reconciles the difference between the statutory federal income tax rate for the Company and the effective income tax rate on continuing operations for the three months ended March 31, 2019:
Statutory rate
21.0
 %
Income subject to tonnage tax
(2.7
)%
Non-deductible expenses
1.0
 %
Noncontrolling interests
(6.3
)%
Foreign earnings not subject to U.S. income tax
(5.8
)%
Foreign taxes not creditable against U.S. income tax
3.8
 %
Subpart F income
0.7
 %
State taxes
0.7
 %
 
12.4
 %

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7. FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS
The fair value of an asset or liability is the price that would be received to sell an asset or transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date. The Company utilizes a fair value hierarchy that maximizes the use of observable inputs and minimizes the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value and defines three levels of inputs that may be used to measure fair value. Level 1 inputs are quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities. Level 2 inputs are observable inputs other than quoted prices included in Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly, including quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets, quoted prices in markets that are not active, inputs other than quoted prices that are observable for the asset or liability, or inputs derived from observable market data. Level 3 inputs are unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities.
As of March 31, 2019, the Company’s financial assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis were as follows (in thousands):
 
Level 1
 
Level 2
 
Level 3
ASSETS
 
 
 
 
 
Cash, cash equivalents, restricted cash and restricted cash equivalents
$
144,144

 
$

 
$

Marketable securities(1)
33,384

 

 

Construction reserve funds
3,908

 

 

______________________
(1)
Marketable security gains (losses), net include unrealized gains of $3.1 million and unrealized losses of $3.8 million for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively, related to marketable security positions held by the Company as of March 31, 2019.
As of March 31, 2019, the estimated fair values of the Company’s other financial assets and liabilities were as follows (in thousands):
 
 
 
Estimated Fair Value
 
Carrying
Amount
 
Level 1
 
Level 2
 
Level 3
ASSETS
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Notes receivable from third parties (included in other receivables and other assets)
$
2,027

 
$

 
$
2,020

 
$

Investments, at cost, in 50% or less owned companies (included in other assets)
4,300

 
see below
 
 
 
 
LIABILITIES
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Long-term debt, including current portion(1)
$
323,611

 
$

 
$
335,144

 
$

______________________
(1)
The estimated fair value includes the embedded conversion options on the Company’s 3.0% Convertible Senior Notes and 3.25% Convertible Senior Notes.
The fair value of the Company’s long-term debt and notes receivable from third parties was estimated based upon quoted market prices or by using discounted cash flow analyses based on estimated current rates for similar types of arrangements. It was not practicable to estimate the fair value of certain of the Company’s investments, at cost, in 50% or less owned companies because of the lack of quoted market prices and the inability to estimate fair value without incurring excessive costs. Considerable judgment was required in developing certain of the estimates of fair value and, accordingly, the estimates presented herein are not necessarily indicative of the amounts that the Company could realize in a current market exchange.
 

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8. NONCONTROLLING INTERESTS IN SUBSIDIARIES
Noncontrolling interests in the Company’s consolidated subsidiaries were as follows (in thousands):
 
Noncontrolling Interests
 
March 31, 2019
 
December 31, 2018
Ocean Services:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SEA-Vista
49%
 
$
163,828

 
$
148,665

Inland Services:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other
3.0
%
51.8%
 
870

 
862

Other
5.0%
 
5

 
161

 
 
 
 
 
$
164,703

 
$
149,688

SEA-Vista. SEA-Vista owns and operates the Company’s fleet of U.S.-flag petroleum and chemical carriers used in the U.S. coastwise trade of crude oil, petroleum and specialty chemical products. As of March 31, 2019, the net assets of SEA-Vista were $334.3 million. During the three months ended March 31, 2019, the net income of SEA-Vista was $10.9 million, of which $5.3 million was attributable to noncontrolling interests. During the three months ended March 31, 2018, the net income of SEA-Vista was $10.0 million, of which $4.9 million was attributable to noncontrolling interests.
9. MULTI-EMPLOYER AND DEFINED BENEFIT PENSION PLANS
AMOPP. During the three months ended March 31, 2019, the Company received notification from the AMOPP that the Company’s withdrawal liability as of September 30, 2018 would have been $28.1 million based on an actuarial valuation performed as of that date. That liability may change in future years based on various factors, primarily employee census. As of March 31, 2019, the Company has no intention to withdraw from the AMOPP and no deficit amounts have been invoiced. Depending upon the results of the future actuarial valuations and the ten-year rehabilitation plan, it is possible that the AMOPP will experience further funding deficits, requiring the Company to recognize additional payroll related operating expenses in the periods invoices are received or contribution levels are increased.
10. SHARE BASED COMPENSATION
During the three months ended March 31, 2019, transactions in connection with the Company’s share based compensation plans were as follows:
Director stock awards granted
625

Employee Stock Purchase Plan (“ESPP”) shares issued
22,577

Restricted stock awards granted
149,950

Stock Option Activities:
 
Outstanding as of December 31, 2018
1,467,391

Granted
38,485

Exercised
(32,732
)
Outstanding as of March 31, 2019
1,473,144

Shares available for future grants and ESPP purchases as of March 31, 2019
672,581

11. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES
As of March 31, 2019, the Company's capital commitments by year of expected payment were as follows (in thousands):
 
Remainder of 2019
 
2020
 
Total
Ocean Services
$
1,378

 
$
8,388

 
$
9,766

Inland Services
17,875

 
1,039

 
18,914

Other
176

 

 
176

 
$
19,429

 
$
9,427

 
$
28,856


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Ocean Services' capital commitments included an interest in two foreign-flag rail ferries. Inland Services’ capital commitments included two inland river towboats, other equipment and vessel and terminal improvements. Subsequent to March 31, 2019, the Company committed to purchase additional equipment for $1.5 million.
During 2012, the Company sold National Response Corporation (“NRC”), NRC Environmental Services Inc., SEACOR Response Ltd., and certain other subsidiaries to J.F. Lehman & Company, a private equity firm (the “SES Business Transaction”).
On December 15, 2010, O’Brien’s Response Management L.L.C. (“ORM”) and NRC were named as defendants in one of the several “master complaints” filed in the overall multi-district litigation relating to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill response and clean-up in the Gulf of Mexico (the “DWH Response), which is currently pending in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana (the “MDL”). The “B3” master complaint naming ORM and NRC asserted various claims on behalf of a putative class against multiple defendants concerning the clean-up activities generally and the use of dispersants specifically. Both prior to and following the filing of the aforementioned “B3” master complaint, individual civil actions naming the Company, ORM, and/or NRC alleging B3 exposure-based injuries and/or damages were consolidated with the MDL and stayed pursuant to court order. On February 16, 2016, all but eleven “B3” claims against ORM and NRC were dismissed with prejudice (the “B3 Dismissal Order”). On August 2, 2016, the Court granted an omnibus motion for summary judgment as it concerns ORM and NRC in its entirety, dismissing the remaining eleven plaintiffs’ claims against ORM and NRC with prejudice (the “Remaining Eleven Plaintiffs’ Dismissal Order”). The deadline to appeal both of these orders has expired. At present, there is only one remaining claim. On April 8, 2013, the Company, ORM, and NRC were named as defendants in William and Dianna Fitzgerald v. BP Exploration et al., No. 2:13-CV-00650 (E.D. La.) (the “Fitzgerald Action”), which is a suit by a husband and wife whose son allegedly participated in the clean-up effort and became ill as a result of his exposure to oil and dispersants. While the decedent in the Fitzgerald Action’s claims against ORM and NRC were dismissed by virtue of the Remaining Eleven Plaintiffs’ Dismissal Order, the claim as against the Company remains stayed. The Company is unable to estimate the potential exposure, if any, resulting from this matter, to the extent it remains viable, but believes it is without merit and does not expect that it will have a material effect on its consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows.
On February 18, 2011, Triton Asset Leasing GmbH, Transocean Holdings LLC, Transocean Offshore Deepwater Drilling Inc., and Transocean Deepwater Inc. (collectively “Transocean”) named ORM and NRC as third-party defendants in a Rule 14(c) Third-Party Complaint in Transocean’s own Limitation of Liability Act action, which is part of the overall MDL, tendering to ORM and NRC the claims in the “B3” master complaint that have already been asserted against ORM and NRC. Various contribution and indemnity cross-claims and counterclaims involving ORM and NRC were subsequently filed. The Company believes that the potential exposure, if any, resulting therefrom has been reduced as a result of the various developments in the MDL, including the B3 Dismissal Order and Remaining Eleven Plaintiffs’ Dismissal Order, and does not expect that these matters will have a material effect on its consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows.
Separately, on March 2, 2012, the Court announced that BP Exploration and Production Inc. (“BPXP”) and BP America Production Company (“BP America,” and with BPXP, “BP”) and the Plaintiffs had reached an agreement on the terms of two proposed class action settlements that will resolve, among other things, Plaintiffs’ economic loss and property damage claims and clean-up related claims against BP. The Company, ORM, and NRC had no involvement in negotiating or agreeing to the terms of either settlement, nor are they parties or signatories thereto. The BP settlement pertaining to personal injury claims (the “Medical Settlement”) purported to resolve the “B3” claims asserted against BP and also established a right for class members to pursue individual claims against BP (but not ORM or NRC) for “later-manifested physical conditions,” defined in the Medical Settlement to be physical conditions that were “first diagnosed” after April 16, 2012 and which are claimed to have resulted from exposure during the DWH Response. The back-end litigation-option (“BELO”) provision of the Medical Settlement has specifically-delineated procedures and limitations, should any “B3” class member seek to invoke their BELO right. For example, there are limitations on the claims and defenses that can be asserted, as well as on the issues, elements, and proofs that may be litigated at any trial and the potential recovery for any Plaintiff. Notwithstanding that the Company, ORM, and NRC are listed on the Medical Settlement’s release as to claims asserted by Plaintiffs, the Medical Settlement still permits BP to seek indemnity from any party, to the extent BP has a valid indemnity right. The Medical Settlement was approved by the Court on January 11, 2013 and made effective on February 12, 2014. As of mid-April 2019, BP has tendered approximately 2,250 claims pursued pursuant to the Medical Settlement’s BELO provision for indemnity to ORM and approximately 210 such claims to NRC. ORM and NRC have rejected all of BP’s indemnity demands relating to the Medical Settlement’s BELO provision and on February 14, 2019 commenced a legal action against BPXP and BP America with respect to same. That action, captioned O’Brien’s Response Management, L.L.C. et al. v. BP Exploration & Production Inc. et al., Case No. 2:19-CV-01418-CJB-JCW (E.D. La.) (the “Declaratory Judgment Action”), seeks declaratory relief that ORM and NRC owe BP no indemnity with respect to the exposure-based claims expressly contemplated by the Medical Settlement’s BELO provision, nor any contribution, in light of BP’s own actions and conduct over the past nine years (including its complete failure to even seek indemnity) and the resultant prejudice to ORM and NRC; that any indemnity or contribution rights BP may have once had with respect to these personal injury and exposure claims were extinguished once the Medical Settlement was approved by the MDL Court in 2013; and that the immunity already afforded to ORM and NRC via the B3 Dismissal Order and the Remaining Eleven Plaintiffs’ Dismissal Order operates to bar any indemnity or contribution claims against them by BP.  BP’s responsive pleading to the Complaint in the Declaratory Judgment Action is due on May 7, 2019.

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The Court has also ordered the parties to participate in early mediation per BP’s request. Mediation is schedule for June 21, 2019 and the parties are in the process of exchanging information in advance of those proceedings.
BP has also similarly recently tendered personal injury claims to ORM and NRC that are being pursued by Plaintiffs who opted out of the Medical Settlement and who are thus proceeding with their “B3” claims in their ordinary course (as opposed to pursuant to the Medical Settlement’s BELO provision). Generally speaking, the Company, ORM, and NRC believe that BP’s indemnity demands with respect to any “B3” claims, including those involving Medical Settlement class members invoking BELO rights and those involving Medical Settlement opt-out Plaintiffs, are untimely and improper, and intend to vigorously defend their interests. Moreover, ORM has contractual indemnity coverage for the above-referenced claims through its separate agreements with sub-contractors that worked for ORM during the DWH Response and have preserved their rights in that regard while the Declaratory Judgment Action is pending. Overall, however, the Company believes that both of BP’s settlements have reduced the potential exposure in connection with the various cases relating to the DWH Response. The Company is unable to estimate the potential exposure, if any, resulting from these claims, but does not expect that they will have a material effect on its consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows.
In the ordinary course of the Company’s business, it may agree to indemnify its counterparty to an agreement. If the indemnified party makes a successful claim for indemnification, the Company would be required to reimburse that party in accordance with the terms of the indemnification agreement. Indemnification agreements generally, but not always, are subject to threshold amounts, specified claim periods and other restrictions and limitations.
In connection with the SES Business Transaction, the Company remains contingently liable for work performed in connection with the DWH Response. Pursuant to the agreement governing the sale, the Company’s potential liability to the purchaser may not exceed the consideration received by the Company for the SES Business Transaction. The Company is currently indemnified under contractual agreements with BP for the potential “B3” liabilities relating to the DWH Response; this indemnification is unrelated to, and thus not impacted by, the indemnification BP has demanded and discussed above.
In the ordinary course of its business, the Company becomes involved in various other litigation matters including, among other things, claims by third parties for alleged property damages and personal injuries. Management has used estimates in determining the Company’s potential exposure to these matters and has recorded reserves in its financial statements related thereto where appropriate. It is possible that a change in the Company’s estimates of that exposure could occur, but the Company does not expect such changes in estimated costs would have a material effect on the Company’s consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

16

Table of Contents

12. SEGMENT INFORMATION
Accounting standards require public business enterprises to report information about each of their operating business segments that exceed certain quantitative thresholds or meet certain other reporting requirements. Operating business segments have been defined as components of an enterprise about which separate financial information is available and is evaluated regularly by the chief operating decision maker in deciding how to allocate resources and in assessing performance. The Company’s basis of measurement of segment profit or loss is as previously defined in the Company’s Annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018. Accounting standards also require companies to disaggregate revenues from contracts with customers into categories to depict how the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows are affected by economic factors. The following tables summarize the operating results, capital expenditures assets and disaggregated revenues of the Company’s reportable segments.
 
 
Ocean
Services
$’000
 
Inland
Services
$’000
 
Witt
O’Brien’s
$’000
 
Other
$’000
 
Corporate
and
Eliminations
$’000
 
Total
$’000
For the three months ended March 31, 2019
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating Revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
External customers
109,272

 
65,602

 
32,845

 
1,805

 

 
209,524

Intersegment

 

 
98

 

 
(98
)
 

 
109,272

 
65,602

 
32,943

 
1,805

 
(98
)
 
209,524

Costs and Expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating
69,932

 
54,245

 
21,772

 
1,253

 
(91
)
 
147,111

Administrative and general
10,198

 
3,356

 
6,402

 
839

 
5,951

 
26,746

Depreciation and amortization
10,337

 
5,725

 
206

 
489

 
379

 
17,136

 
90,467

 
63,326

 
28,380

 
2,581

 
6,239

 
190,993

Gains on Asset Dispositions
17

 
420

 

 

 

 
437

Operating Income (Loss)
18,822

 
2,696

 
4,563

 
(776
)
 
(6,337
)
 
18,968

Other Income (Expense):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Foreign currency gains (losses), net
(47
)
 
459

 

 

 
(7
)
 
405

Other, net
(651
)
 

 
(3
)
 

 
10

 
(644
)
Equity in Earnings (Losses) of 50% or Less Owned Companies, Net of Tax
111

 
(2,472
)
 
(67
)
 
(90
)
 

 
(2,518
)
Segment Profit (Loss)
18,235

 
683

 
4,493

 
(866
)
 
 
 
 
Other Income (Expense) not included in Segment Profit (Loss)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(938
)
Less Equity Losses included in Segment Profit (Loss)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2,518

Income Before Taxes and Equity Losses
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
17,791

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Capital Expenditures
247

 
5,237

 
20

 
145

 

 
5,649

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
As of March 31, 2019
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Property and Equipment:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Historical cost
930,464

 
444,609

 
1,246

 
7,037

 
30,132

 
1,413,488

Accumulated depreciation
(352,005
)
 
(200,516
)
 
(1,053
)
 
(979
)
 
(22,583
)
 
(577,136
)
Net property and equipment
578,459

 
244,093

 
193

 
6,058

 
7,549

 
836,352

Operating Lease Right-of-Use Assets
125,640

 
36,534

 
987

 

 
4,164

 
167,325

Investments, at Equity, and Advances to 50% or Less Owned Companies
74,127

 
56,238

 
419

 
24,506

 

 
155,290

Inventories
2,042

 
2,183

 
366

 
323

 

 
4,914

Goodwill
1,852

 
2,362

 
28,506

 

 

 
32,720

Intangible Assets
8,633

 
8,618

 
6,411

 

 

 
23,662

Other current and long-term assets, excluding cash and near cash assets(1)
53,070

 
62,832

 
91,591

 
2,383

 
10,231

 
220,107

Segment Assets
843,823

 
412,860

 
128,473

 
33,270

 
 
 
 
Cash and near cash assets(1)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
181,436

Total Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1,621,806

______________________
(1)
Cash and near cash assets includes cash, cash equivalents, restricted cash, restricted cash equivalents, marketable securities and construction reserve funds.

17

Table of Contents

 
Ocean
Services
$’000
 
Inland
Services
$’000
 
Witt
O’Brien’s
$’000
 
Other
$’000
 
Corporate
and
Eliminations
$’000
 
Total
$’000
For the three months ended March 31, 2019
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenues from Contracts with Customers:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Voyage charters
9,314

 

 

 

 

 
9,314

Contracts of affreightment
3,730

 
48,984

 

 

 

 
52,714

Tariff
20,996

 

 

 

 

 
20,996

Unit freight
16,012

 

 

 

 

 
16,012

Terminal operations

 
5,480

 

 

 

 
5,480

Fleeting operations

 
4,070

 

 

 

 
4,070

Logistics Services

 
3,538

 

 

 

 
3,538

Time and material contracts

 

 
29,946

 

 

 
29,946

Retainer contracts

 

 
2,405

 

 

 
2,405

Product sales(1)

 

 

 
1,310

 

 
1,310

Other
934

 
902

 
592

 
255

 
(98
)
 
2,585

Lease Revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Time charter, bareboat charter and rental income
58,286

 
2,628

 

 
240

 

 
61,154

 
109,272


65,602

 
32,943

 
1,805

 
(98
)
 
209,524

______________________
(1)
Costs of goods sold related to product sales was $1.1 million.
 

18

Table of Contents

 
Ocean
Services
$’000
 
Inland
Services
$’000
 
Witt
O’Brien’s
$’000
 
Other
$’000
 
Corporate
and
Eliminations
$’000
 
Total
$’000
For the three months ended March 31, 2018
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating Revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
External customers
102,384

 
55,921

 
26,403

 
116

 

 
184,824

Intersegment

 

 
29

 

 
(29
)
 

 
102,384

 
55,921

 
26,432

 
116

 
(29
)
 
184,824

Costs and Expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating
65,333

 
48,181

 
18,306

 

 
(43
)
 
131,777

Administrative and general
10,549

 
3,312

 
5,367

 
186

 
6,381

 
25,795

Depreciation and amortization
12,645

 
6,234

 
301

 

 
429

 
19,609

 
88,527

 
57,727

 
23,974

 
186

 
6,767

 
177,181

Gains on Asset Dispositions
1,883

 
5,162

 

 

 

 
7,045

Operating Income (Loss)
15,740

 
3,356

 
2,458

 
(70
)
 
(6,796
)
 
14,688

Other Income (Expense):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Foreign currency gains (losses), net
(51
)
 
1,703

 
2

 

 
36

 
1,690

Other, net
283

 

 

 

 

 
283

Equity in Earnings (Losses) of 50% or Less Owned Companies, Net of Tax
315

 
(2,454
)
 
135

 
1,167

 

 
(837
)
Segment Profit
16,287

 
2,605

 
2,595

 
1,097

 
 
 
 
Other Income (Expense) not included in Segment Profit
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(10,547
)
Less Equity Losses included in Segment Profit
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
837

Income Before Taxes and Equity Losses
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6,114

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Capital Expenditures
7,516

 
1,899

 

 

 
127

 
9,542

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
As of March 31, 2018
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Property and Equipment:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Historical cost
901,747

 
437,411

 
1,227

 

 
30,132

 
1,370,517

Accumulated depreciation
(309,371
)
 
(179,152
)
 
(961
)
 

 
(20,934
)
 
(510,418
)
Net property and equipment
592,376

 
258,259


266




9,198

 
860,099

Investments, at Equity, and Advances to 50% or Less Owned Companies
53,620

 
64,744

 
734

 
51,207

 

 
170,305

Inventories
1,732

 
2,039

 
50

 

 

 
3,821

Goodwill
1,852

 
2,449

 
28,506

 

 

 
32,807

Intangible Assets
9,961

 
10,112

 
7,999

 

 

 
28,072

Other current and long-term assets, excluding cash and near cash assets(1)
57,593

 
54,531

 
43,563

 
1,770

 
8,655

 
166,112

Segment Assets
717,134

 
392,134

 
81,118

 
52,977

 
 
 
 
Cash and near cash assets(1)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
351,257

Total Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1,612,473

______________________
(1)
Cash and near cash assets includes cash, cash equivalents, restricted cash, restricted cash equivalents, marketable securities and construction reserve funds.

19

Table of Contents

 
Ocean
Services
$’000
 
Inland
Services
$’000
 
Witt
O’Brien’s
$’000
 
Other
$’000
 
Corporate
and
Eliminations
$’000
 
Total
$’000
For the three months ended March 31, 2018
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenues from Contracts with Customers:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Voyage charters
16,501

 

 

 

 

 
16,501

Contracts of affreightment
5,006

 
40,290

 

 

 

 
45,296

Tariff
18,001

 

 

 

 

 
18,001

Unit freight
13,384

 

 

 

 

 
13,384

Terminal operations

 
5,746

 

 

 

 
5,746

Fleeting operations

 
4,211

 

 

 

 
4,211

Logistics Services

 
2,815

 

 

 

 
2,815

Time and material contracts

 

 
23,625

 

 

 
23,625

Retainer contracts

 

 
2,383

 

 

 
2,383

Other
852

 
960

 
424

 
116

 
(29
)
 
2,323

Lease Revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Time charter, bareboat charter and rental income
48,640

 
1,899

 

 

 

 
50,539

 
102,384

 
55,921

 
26,432

 
116

 
(29
)
 
184,824


20

Table of Contents

ITEM 2.
MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
This Form 10-Q includes “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Certain statements discussed in this Form 10-Q as well as in other reports, materials and oral statements that the Company releases from time to time constitute “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Generally, words such as “anticipate,” “estimate,” “expect,” “project,” “intend,” “believe,” “plan,” “target,” “forecast” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Such forward-looking statements concern management’s expectations, strategic objectives, business prospects, anticipated economic performance and financial condition and other similar matters. Forward-looking statements are inherently uncertain and subject to a variety of assumptions, risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those anticipated or expected by management of the Company. These statements are not guarantees of future performance and actual events or results may differ significantly from these statements. Actual events or results are subject to significant known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other important factors, including risks relating to weakening demand for the Company’s services as a result of unplanned customer suspensions, cancellations, rate reductions or non-renewals of vessel charters or failures to finalize co